The bedroom where Zaha Hadid displayed her Murano glass

Nearly every object in the architect's bedroom was her own work – except for her prized collection of glassware
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Zaha Hadid's bedroom in London. Completed 2006. From Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century.
Zaha Hadid's bedroom in London. Completed 2006. From Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century.

She may have been known as ‘the Queen of the Curve’ for her beautiful, sinuous buildings, but when the late British-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid came to choose and decorate - or curate - her own bedroom, a few straight lines and right angles found their way in.

“Hadid’s own home occupied the penthouse of an otherwise nondescript - from the outside at least - three-story apartment building in Clerkenwell, London,” explains the text in Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century.

The simple, box-like interior, may have been a bit out of character, yet it allowed the architect and designer to focus less on the building, and more on the objects it contained, many of which were her own creations.

“The space’s white-cube aesthetic interior made the perfect backdrop for an extraordinary array of art and design pieces, all of which Hadid designed herself,” explains the book. “The only exceptions to this rule were the Murano glass pieces she collected.”

 

The Murano glass on display in Zaha Hadid's bedroom. As featured in Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century
The Murano glass on display in Zaha Hadid's bedroom. As featured in Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century

Perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised to learn that Hadid favoured the shapely glassware from the Venetian lagoon. The slinky lines look quite a lot like her own architecture, and clearly compliment other works in the room.

“Hadid’s own 1977 painting, Malevich’s Tektonik, originally presented as part of her AA thesis project, adorned one wall while the placement of some of her 3-D design works, such as her Stalagmite & Stalactite Table, added further to the gallery feel,” explains our book. “Like the rest of the apartment, the bedroom was a minimalistic space, complete with white floor and blinds, but any personal effects that were on show echoed the sculptural qualities of the furniture upon which they were placed. Her dressing table, for example, was covered in an array of colorful perfume bottles, brushes, and mirrors, lined up in orderly fashion as though they were tools on an architect's desk.”

 

The Platinum Gray edition of Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century

For more on interior design from the beginning of the 20th Century up until the present day, order a copy of Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century here; you can even choose your book’s colour. There are four to choose from: saffron yellowplatinum graymerlot red and midnight blue. Pick the right one for your own interior here.

 


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