The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects. All renderings courtesy of MAD
The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects. All renderings courtesy of MAD

Could MAD’s building bring big ideas to northern China?

The firm's new conference centre aims to bring bright ideas and brilliant conversation to Yabuli, the Davos of China

Yabuli, the winter sports resort near Harbin, up by the border with Russia, is sometimes described as the Davos of China. It already hosts the annual China Entrepreneurs Forum, and local developers hope to attract more business leaders to this spot in Heilongjiang, China’s most northerly, province, by commissioning one of the country’s greatest architectural practice, Ma Yangsong's firm MAD, to create this eye-catching conference centre.

 

The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects
The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects

Work began on The Yabuli Conference Centre last year and is due to complete in 2020. Despite its striking looks, MAD says the building is designed to fit into the alpine surroundings.

 

The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects
The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects

“Casually mirroring its mountainous backdrop, it reaches a maximum height of 24 meters, allowing it to settle quietly into the landscape,” explains the practice. “While humble in its presence, it does not lose the dynamic atmosphere of northern China – integrated with the sky, the ground, the snow, the forest, and the mountains.”

 

The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects
The Yabuli Conference Centre by MAD Architects

The building’s interior, meanwhile, aims to foster inner contemplation and dialogue. “The focal point is a skylight positioned at the centre of the roof that allows natural light to flood into the interior,” says MAD. “It acts as a symbolic metaphor for the bright ideas and brilliant discussions generated during the events held within.” Let's hope so. 

 

MAD Works by MAD Architects
MAD Works by MAD Architects

To see more of MAD’s work order a copy of our book on the architects, MAD Works, here.