This is Tomorrow: the work of Richard Hamilton

Collages and paintings which became the main forces behind the development of Pop art
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Richard Hamilton, Poster for 'This is Tomorrow' exhibition (1956)

1 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Poster for 'This is Tomorrow' exhibition (1956)

Richard Hamilton, Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing? (1956)

2 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing? (1956)

Richard Hamilton, Hommage à Chrysler Corp... (1957)

3 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Hommage à Chrysler Corp... (1957)

4 / 16

Richard Hamilton, Hers is Lush Situation (1958)

5 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Hers is Lush Situation (1958)

Richard Hamilton with photographer Robert Freeman, 'Self Portrait', cover of Living Arts, 2 (1963)

6 / 16 Richard Hamilton with photographer Robert Freeman, 'Self Portrait', cover of Living Arts, 2 (1963)

Richard Hamilton, Portrait of Hugh Gaitskill as a Famous Monster of Filmland (1964)

7 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Portrait of Hugh Gaitskill as a Famous Monster of Filmland (1964)

Richard Hamilton, Epiphany (1964)

8 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Epiphany (1964)

Richard Hamilton, People (1965-66)

9 / 16 Richard Hamilton, People (1965-66)

Richard Hamilton, Swingeing London 67 (1968)

10 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Swingeing London 67 (1968)

Richard Hamilton, Swingeing London 67 (1968-1969)

11 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Swingeing London 67 (1968-1969)

Richard Hamilton, The Citizen (1981-1983)

12 / 16 Richard Hamilton, The Citizen (1981-1983)

Richard Hamilton, Treatment Room (1983-1984)

13 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Treatment Room (1983-1984)

Richard Hamilton, The Subject (1988-1990)

14 / 16 Richard Hamilton, The Subject (1988-1990)

Richard Hamilton, The State (1993)

15 / 16 Richard Hamilton, The State (1993)

Richard Hamilton, Shock and Awe 
(2007-2008)

16 / 16 Richard Hamilton, Shock and Awe 
(2007-2008)


Richard Hamilton is often referred to as the 'father of Pop art'. The artist engaged with mass media through his series of paintings, installations and prints (some, like Unorthodox Rendition, 2010, in which he used politics, riots, war and terrorist acts as subject matter.

Swingeing London (1967-73), a series of works based on the arrest of Mick Jagger and Hamilton's gallerist Robert Fraser for drug possession, show how portraiture was of particular interest to him. These pictures, which include Tony Blair as a middle-aged maverick cowboy in Shock and Awe (2007-8), as well as televised speeches of Margaret Thatcher in Treatment Room (1983), can be read as reflections on a celebrity-obsessed media and critical comments on the governing powers at the time.


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