Concrete - a visual gazetteer

This workday building material has been sculpted into some incredible shapes
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Guggenheim Museum, New York

1 / 10 Guggenheim Museum, New York

Penguin Pool, London Zoo, 1934

2 / 10 Penguin Pool, London Zoo, 1934

Concrete-Pod, Nagoya, Japan

3 / 10 Concrete-Pod, Nagoya, Japan

The Pantheon, Rome

4 / 10 The Pantheon, Rome

Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge Channel, Saitama, Japan

5 / 10 Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge Channel, Saitama, Japan

Teshima Art Museum, Japan

6 / 10 Teshima Art Museum, Japan

San Cristobal Stables, Mexico City

7 / 10 San Cristobal Stables, Mexico City

The Ennis House, Los Angeles

8 / 10 The Ennis House, Los Angeles

Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum, Rio de Janeiro

9 / 10 Niteroi Contemporary Art Museum, Rio de Janeiro

Truffle, Costa de Morte

10 / 10 Truffle, Costa de Morte


The Romans cast their temples from it, Le Corbusier delighted in it, and Frank Lloyd Wright described its potential to be a ‘permanent, noble, beautiful’ building material. Concrete is hardly the most romantic of substances, yet its incredible properties have enabled the construction of ancient pagan temples, breathtaking Brazilian galleries and straw-filled Spanish hermitages. In celebration of our new Concrete book, we present some of the boldest buildings ever poured.


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